Some desire the comfort and class of the high-end luxury cars. Others want the style and flash of the most exotic brands. Then there is a group of people who want something a little more dangerous. These are the fans of the classic American Muscle Cars. These are the people who do not care for all the fancy frills offered in the cars of today. Instead, what they want most is the pure, raw power that was only available from these American-made cars in the 1960s and 1970s.
A muscle car is by definition, an American-made car, typically a two-door coupe and fitted with a V-8 engine. Though some muscle cars do have four doors and some may even be convertibles, two things are a must. They must be American-made and they must have a V-8 engine. The engine is the most important component of a muscle car. Anything less than eight cylinders cannot produce enough horsepower to provide the power that a muscle car needs.
Some of the American auto companies have re-released version of their original muscle cars. Pontiac did it with the GTO and Dodge has been very successful at selling new Challengers and Chargers. However, these are not the real deal. By definition a classic car is at least 30 years old and no more than 49 years old. Anything newer is nothing but an imitation and anything older is vintage.
This list is for people who are looking for the genuine classic muscle car. If the car wasn’t made from 1965 to 1984 is it not a classic and is not included. This list does not take into account model years. Some cars had very few models produced in a particular year. If the production years were included there would be a lot of the same model cars repeated. Instead, it only considers the model of the car. Things like convertible versus hardtop or engine model is taken into consideration. These are very important factors in the production of muscle cars. They are what truly drives the price of the cars up and down. It also allows for more variety so you can enjoy looking at and learning about these great examples of American ingenuity.

1970 Plymouth Hemi Superbird — 135 Produced

The Superbird was a highly modified version of Plymouth’s already highly successful Roadrunner line. The car was designed for racing purposes. It was a follow up to Plymouth’s parent company Dodge’s Charger Daytona. The Superbird was fitted with a 426 cubic inch Hemi engine and many MOPAR high performance parts. The cars have become famous for their high mounted, wing-like spoiler (which allowed the trunk to open underneath it, the same drag coefficient would have been achieved with a much smaller wing) and its horn which copied the sound from the Looney Tunes’ Roadrunner character. The Superbirds were only made in 1970 and Plymouth only produced 135 of them.